Construction Update for Highstreet Abbotsford

Was able to visit Highstreet in Abbotsford and find some updated pictures of how the construction is coming along. The mall should be opening by Spring of 2013 and include 600,000 square feet of retail space. So far the main anchor tenants are Wal-Mart, London Drugs and Cineplex with 11 screens.

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Entrance to Highstreet Mall off Cardinal Avenue in Abbotsford, BC

The downside of the Highstreet development as it stands is that it is mostly surrounded by the Freeway (Highway 1) and  suburban single family houses on the other side. It would seem like a completely missed opportunity if there is not a significant stock of medium and high density development around it to take full advantage of it’s pedestrian friendly design. As with most other malls in the Metro Vancouver region, it is highly likely that some form of high density housing will be placed around it at some point.

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View of Highstreet mall from Highway 1 in Abbotsford, BC

It’s clear in looking at the location and design of the mall that it’s main source of customers will come via Highway 1. Perhaps another large anchor will join Wal-Mart and London drugs to round out the anchors.

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Highstreet mall as seen from Mt. Lehman Road in Abbotsford, BC

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North Kamloops Photo Gallery

Kamloop’s Thompson Rivers University – At the Forefront of Uptown’s New Walkability

Nestled atop uptown Kamloops lies one of BC’s best kept University secrets. Thompson Rivers University’s 13,000 students speak to its rank as one of BC’s largest universities, yet few in the populated areas of the South Coast know of it’s very existence. TRU is at the forefront of Kamloops’ second downtown, an area known as uptown which is quickly expanding in residents and walkability. The main campus and buildings of Thompson Rivers University are centred around a walkable grassy mall which makes it truly pedestrian friendly. The student population is composed of many international students which give the City of Kamloops a cosmopolitan feeling typical of most much larger major cities.

Thompson Rivers University

Thompson Rivers University

Many of the campus buildings are relatively new, they together with some older buildings form the nucleus of this sprawling campus. Renovations are currently under way to add extra floors to the Old Main building, once finished these new floors and exterior look will house the TRU Faculty of Law. Picture above are the International Building on the right and on the left is the Arts and Education building.

Clock Tower & Library - Thompson Rivers University

Clock Tower & Library – Thompson Rivers University

House of Learning - Thompson Rivers University

House of Learning – Thompson Rivers University

Balanced Communities : Commercial space makes a comeback in Vancouver


It appears as though Vancouver has gotten over its near anaemic growth in new office space.  4 new projects promise to add enough commercial space to at least attempt to keep pace with new demand in the downtown core. What is certain is that Vancouver will have to develop several more projects if it is to begin to try to re-establish a balance between residential and commercial space that has been made unbalanced by the condo boom of the 1990’s.

Past conversions of such well known commercial architectural gems as the Duke Energy building and the BC Hydro building should never again be allowed to happen. While government intervention to promote public transit and higher density are examples of good things, conversions of these buildings have shown us the government mistakes. Keeping taxes significantly higher on commercial space has already added the soft market; going ahead with the conversions was almost a death blow to downtown office space. What they need to now do is lower these taxes and further encourage offices to locate downtown Vancouver and not out in some suburban office park.

With downtown office vacancy currently hovering around 3.7% there is not a growing push on to build new commercial towers. Almost all of the newly planned AAA office space in the Vancouver area appears to be headed for downtown. A cluster of new developments are being proposed to meet the growing demand for space. One can only hope that these new developments signal a future where downtown development is more balanced between residential and commercial interests. Before these new projects, Vancouver was at real danger of becoming one of the few North American cities with a reverse-commute out of downtown.

It’s an encouraging sign to see most of the new office space is going in around existing skytrain stations. While perhaps not most of the new development will take place downtown Vancouver it does serve much of the same purpose to have this development occurring at high density rapid transit stations complementing high density residential in those areas. There is a hungry and talented pool of young urban professionals in these condo buildings downtown who are craving jobs which are close to home. The addition of these buildings has the potential to make such newer downtown neighbourhoods as Coal Harbour and Yaletown much more complete communities where people do not drive to work.

Figure 4 from City of Vancouver clearly shows the Office building boom of the 70s and 80s followed by the Condo Boom that followed.

Pacific Northwest: Where Airport Rapid Transit is the rule, not the exception.

The new standard for world-class cities is for them to have efficient rapid transit to and from the airport. In North America especially, this has been so far difficult for most major cities to achieve. What were once top priority plans to expand rapid rail transit airports in cities across this continent, are now nothing more than long-term planning at best. What went wrong? Well a whole lot more than went right, from the financial collapse to cost overruns, bad planning and lack of funding. Let’s take a look at three cities in the Pacific North West where it has gone right instead.

Vancouver

The city built the $2 billion plus Canada Line to Vancouver International Airport to coincide with the 2010 Winter Olympics. At the time the rising cost of construction and ridership predictions which were considered way too generous caused a lot of backlash against this project. Usage has grown steadily from 83,000 in September 2009 to well over 110,000 in February 2011. The line carried a record of 228,190 people during the 2010 Olympics and is well on track to meet its 2021 ridership target of 142,000.

What went right here is that all levels of government came forward to recognize the true importance of connecting the Downtown Vancouver area with Canada’s second largest airport and Asian hub (YVR). People coming in and going out of the city now have a 25 minute ride into downtown that is reliable and efficient even in the worst rush-hour traffic. The rail line is even now sparking multitudes of pedestrian friendly and transit-orientated development along its route.

City Vancouver
Metro Population 2,659,623
Current Rapid Transit Network Skytrain – 3 lines, 47 stations, 69 km.
Daily Ridership 381,100
Airport Connection Since 2009
Future? 3 expansion lines by 2020

Expanded Skytrain Network 2020

 

Seattle

Years ago few would have predicted rapid transit in the Emerald city, let alone rapid transit connecting downtown and the airport. Expansions to Monorail and the building of light rail were shot down time and time again. Eventually cooler heads prevailed and today Seattle  is undergoing a light rail renaissance with 2 active lines and more than 5 other expansion projects in various stages of development. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is the regions largest, serving over 30 million passengers each year. With the ongoing traffic jams along Highway 5 it only made sense to give people an alternative to driving.

Ridership of 25,000 in a metropolitan area of over 4 million may seem like small potatoes. When you consider that Seattle was late to the game in building rail rapid transit and has only had it operational for a handful of years, it’s a good deal of progress. While the city may have a long way to go to catch transit friendly Vancouver in ridership numbers, Portland on the other hand may be within striking distance if the building of light rail continues at such a rate.

City Seattle
Metro Population 3,439,809
Current Rapid Transit Network Link Light Rail – 2 lines, 18 stations, 17miles (28km)
Daily Ridership 24,700
Airport Connection Since 2009
Future? 3 expansion lines by 2023

 

Portland

Out of the 3 biggest Northwest cities, Portland was the first to establish a direct link between downtown and its own airport (PDX). Portland has a light rail system called MAX (Metropolitan Area Express) which is similar to Seattle’s yet much more extensive and established.

City Portland
Metro Population 2,238,895
Current Rapid Transit Network MAX Light Rail – 4 lines, 85 stations, 52miles (84km)
Daily Ridership 121,300
Airport Connection Since 2001
Future? 3 expansion lines by 2023

BC to hand New West Gas Works site

It appears as though the province is set to hand the City of New Westminster control over one of its most historic sites and buildings. The former Gas Works building which sits on the corner of 3rd ave and 12th street is the oldest remaining brick building in New Westminster, one of only 3 coal gasification plants left in BC. The building was constructed in 1886 and it was one of the buildings to survive the Great Fire of 1898. The building takes us back to the era when New Westminster was more economically important than Vancouver, at time when industry was at the city`s heart.

Plans for the site include a potential fire hall as well as children’s playground and additional park space. The site does require extensive decontamination and as such there has been discussion about removing the Gas Works building during the process and subsequent reconstruction. This is a very exciting opportunity for the city to retain some of its most prized heritage while also tackling its deficit of public parks and spaces. I sincerely hope the city and its residents see the value in keeping this once important building for future generations. Here are a few ideas of the potential redesign by the city and Ramsay Worden Architects;